Bullying prevention – Actions we can take

Individuals and organizations have a role to play in preventing bullying and promoting healthy relationships.

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Bullying prevention

24-hour help

Call 911 if you or someone you know is in immediate danger.

Bullying Helpline – Call 310-1818 or text* 310-1818 or chat online for support, information or referrals.
*Standard text message rates may apply.

What you can do

  • Learn to recognize bullying and know the warning signs.
  • Respond to bullying situations by:
    • telling the person assertively to stop the bullying
    • going and getting help
    • supporting the person targeted after the situation is over, and
    • letting them know they do not deserve that treatment and it is not their fault
  • Be supportive when someone tells you about a bullying experience.
  • Role model healthy relationships by:
    • listening and showing empathy, kindness, honesty and respect
    • being helpful and cooperative
    • showing ways to work through complex social situations
    • helping others understand the benefits of strong social supports
  • Get involved in Bullying Awareness Week and other bullying prevention activities throughout the year.
  • Share resources about bullying through social media and in your community to build awareness and understanding.
  • Help develop and support bullying prevention policies and practices in your workplace, social, sports and community organizations.

What schools can do

  • Develop and implement a school-wide plan for bullying prevention and building healthy relationships by involving teachers, volunteers, parents, caregivers, and most importantly, students.
  • Foster the development of healthy relationships, healthy communication skills, conflict resolution skills and intervention skills.
  • Ensure staff and volunteers work together to respond consistently to bullying situations and show leadership by modelling healthy interactions with others.
  • Support students in setting up a gay-straight alliance (GSA) or queer-straight alliance (QSA).
  • Support Pink Shirt Day and other events promoting healthy relationships.

What employers can do

  • Establish policies clearly defining bullying and harassment, the organization’s response and the resources that are available.
  • Support employees who may be dealing with bullying at work or in other settings.
  • Share information with all employees at meetings, online or through print resources.
  • Display prevention and support information in areas where your customers or clients can see it or take it with them.
  • Work with community organizations to provide funding for programs and services to help people who have been bullied.
  • Sponsor an event to raise awareness during Bullying Awareness Week.
  • Support Pink Shirt Day and other events promoting healthy relationships.

What people in sports can do

Coaches and volunteers

  • Hold a pre-season meeting with other coaches, volunteers, parents, athletes and board members to discuss acceptable behaviour and bullying prevention strategies.
  • Understand that you are a role model to players and set a good example.
  • Promote healthy relationships by encouraging empathy, kindness, honesty and respect.
  • Respond to bullying situations immediately and consistently.
  • Establish open and honest communication between parents, players, managers and volunteers.
  • Look at your behaviour and accept feedback without being defensive. Change your behaviour, if needed.
  • Think of screening procedures, policy and training as opportunities to learn and create a safer and healthier sporting environment for everyone.
  • Get certified to coach sports through a national or provincial governing body.
  • Become an active member of a provincial sport governing body with a code of ethics and harassment policy.

Parents and adults

  • Understand that you are a role model and set a good example.
  • Maintain open and honest communication with your child and the coach.
  • Make sure to participate in the pre-season meeting to discuss acceptable behaviours and bullying prevention strategies.
  • Ask whether the coach is certified and belongs to a provincial sport governing body with a code of ethics and harassment policy. If not, work with the coach, other parents and board members to have the coach certified.
  • Attend practices and games whenever possible. If private practices are scheduled, ask why they are needed.
  • If you see bullying during a game, tell the coach or the officials.
  • When bullying happens during practice or before or after games, discuss the situation with the coach, volunteers and other parents to reach a solution.

Players

  • Take part in the pre-season meeting to discuss acceptable behaviours and bullying prevention strategies.
  • Understand that you are a role model to other players and set a good example.
  • Tell a coach, parent or someone you trust if you, or someone on your team, is being bullied.