Overview

The Government of Alberta apologized to survivors of the Sixties Scoop.

The Sixties Scoop refers to a period of time in Canada when an unknown number of Indigenous children were taken from their parents and communities by child intervention services and placed with mostly non-Indigenous families.

Many children lost touch with their families, communities, culture and traditional language. This caused lasting negative issues with mental, spiritual, emotional and physical health and well-being.

Survivors and their families are still feeling the effects of the Sixties Scoop today.

The apology is part of Alberta's commitment to reconciliation.

The apology

Premier Rachel Notley delivered the apology to survivors and families from the Alberta legislature on Monday, May 28.

The day began with a pipe ceremony and grand entry into the legislature. After the ceremony, a victory song was sung on the steps of the legislature and Adam North Peigan, president of the Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Alberta, offered a response.

View the photos:

Hearing from survivors

We worked closely with the Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Alberta (SSISA) to help shape how our government could offer an apology in a way that is meaningful and promotes healing.

Survivors, their families and community members were invited to be part of this process so we could gain a deeper understanding of how the Sixties Scoop affected people’s lives.

We held 6 engagement sessions across the province and received online and mail-in submissions to hear from survivors and learn more about the Sixties Scoop. The input we received through this process was used to inform the apology from the Government of Alberta to the Sixties Scoop survivors.

To learn more about the engagement process, visit the Sixties Scoop Apology Engagement page.

About SSISA

Logo for the Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Alberta

Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Alberta (SSISA) is a non-profit society formed to represent survivors in Alberta, create dialogue and engagement and develop true reconciliation.

Board members include representatives from Treaty 6, Treaty 7, Treaty 8, as well as Inuit and Métis representatives.

As survivors themselves, SSISA members are committed to raising awareness and supporting other survivors.

Survivors can connect with SSISA on their facebook page.

News

Alberta apologizes to Sixties Scoop survivors (May 28, 2018)