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Fighting mountain pine beetle in Canmore

The Alberta government is partnering with the Town of Canmore to combat mountain pine beetle.

Fighting mountain pine beetle in Canmore

L-R: Cam Westhead, MLA for Banff-Cochrane, Oneil Carlier, Minister of Agriculture and Forestry and John Borrowman, mayor of Canmore.

The mountain pine beetle threatens six million hectares of Alberta’s pine forest and affects the activities of more than half of the major forest companies operating in the province.

In order to protect Alberta’s crucial forestry industry, the province is providing Canmore with $75,000 for the control, suppression and eradication of mountain pine beetle on municipal and private lands. The funds are part of the Mountain Pine Beetle Municipal Grant Funding Program which helps communities minimize the spread of mountain pine beetle infestations in their areas.

“Our best chance to combat the mountain pine beetle infestation is if our government partners with local municipalities on aggressive and proactive detection and control programs. This funding will help us work with the Town of Canmore to do that.”

Oneil Carlier, Minister of Agriculture and Forestry

“Protecting our trees from these deadly infestations wouldn’t be possible without this level of commitment from the province. Now we will be able to continue our important work to slow the beetle's progress and prevent further damage.”

John Borrowman, mayor, Town of Canmore

“Alberta’s forests are valuable for so many reasons. Residents and tourists alike enjoy the natural splendour of the Bow Valley. I’m proud that our government is helping communities like Canmore take action to protect their forests against mountain pine beetle.”

Cameron Westhead, MLA for Banff-Cochrane

Quick facts about mountain pine beetle

  • Mountain pine beetle threatens six million hectares of Alberta’s pine forest.
  • The value of pure pine stands in Alberta is more than $8 billion.
  • Last year, more than 92,000 trees across the province were cut and burned to help control the mountain pine beetle outbreak.
  • More than half of the major forest companies operating in Alberta are reliant on pine to continue operations.

Media inquiries

Government of Alberta