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Pedestrian safety is everyone’s business

When Daylight Savings Time ends this weekend, evenings will get dark earlier – and drivers and pedestrians should use extra caution at crosswalks.

Pedestrian collisions tend to be higher in months with lower light and inclement weather conditions. Between 2010 and 2014, on average, 43 pedestrians were killed and more than 1,170 were injured each year.

“All road users share responsibility to make sure people cross the street safely. Drivers need to slow down and proceed only after pedestrians have finished crossing the street, and pedestrians should be alert and pay attention to motorists to make sure it is safe to cross. Pedestrian Safety Month is a time to remind everyone to use caution. ”

Brian Mason, Minister of Transportation

“Injuries are the leading cause of death in Albertans between the ages of one and 44. Most injuries, including those involving vehicles and pedestrians, are not “accidents.” They are often predictable and preventable. By being aware and removing possible hazards, such as distracted driving activities, we can help keep drivers and pedestrians safe.”

Dr. Karen Grimsrud, Chief Medical Officer of Health

Pedestrians who have been drinking are also at risk of death or injury. On average, each year between 2010 and 2014, 17 pedestrians involved in fatal collisions and 119 involved in injury collisions had consumed alcohol.  

Pedestrian safety facts

  • The majority of pedestrian casualty collisions (95.8 per cent) occurred in urban areas in 2014.
  • In 2014, 47.9 per cent of drivers involved in pedestrian casualty collisions failed to yield the right of way to the pedestrian.
  • In 2014, the rate of injury or death per 10,000 people was highest for pedestrians aged 15 to 19. However, 78 per cent of pedestrians killed were 25 and older.
  • The likeliest time for these collisions was between 3 p.m. and 7 p.m., and more incidents occurred on Thursdays than any other day (2014).
  • In 2014, 32.6 per cent of pedestrians involved in fatal collisions had consumed alcohol, compared with 10 per cent of pedestrians in injury collisions. Pedestrians aged 20-24 had the highest rate of involvement. 
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Media inquiries

Government of Alberta