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Rural water projects get $131 million in grants

The Government of Alberta is funding critical water projects across Alberta as part of the ongoing commitment to provide clean drinking water and wastewater treatment to rural Albertans.

Sylvan Lake waterfront

Sylvan Lake waterfront

More than $131 million from the Water for Life and the Alberta Municipal Water/Wastewater Partnership grant programs will support 29 water infrastructure projects across the province. Once projects get underway, the investment will help sustain approximately 900 jobs.

The approved projects include a wastewater line from Sylvan Lake to Red Deer, with $37 million in provincial Water for Life grants. The line will handle wastewater from the Sylvan Lake region to meet the current and future needs of the community as it taps into its potential as a growing tourism destination.

“Anyone visiting this region on a sunny summer day will see throngs of people along the streets, in shops, at restaurants and at the beach. This is just one more example of how our government is investing in the infrastructure needed to build the economy here and across Alberta to help create jobs and to make life better for Albertans.”

Brian Mason, Minister of Transportation and Minister of Infrastructure

Sylvan Lake Mayor Sean McIntyre noted the community’s need for a long-term wastewater solution is well documented.

“We’ve seen great support, understanding and patience from our residents, while we’ve worked toward connecting to the Red Deer Regional Wastewater System. Today we celebrate as a region, knowing we have the support of our provincial government for this important project. We look forward to a continued collaboration with our regional partners to ensure public and environmental health, while balancing the fiscal impact of doing so."

Mayor Sean McIntyre, Town of Sylvan Lake

Members of the Alberta Association of Municipal Districts and Counties that are receiving these critical water grants are also pleased the provincial government is addressing the needs of rural Albertans.

“Both the Water for Life and the Alberta Municipal Water/Wastewater Partnership programs are vital for the continued health and welfare of all Albertans. Programs such as these allow rural Albertans to know their municipal councils and the province have their well-being top of mind.”

John Whaley, director, Alberta Association of Municipal Districts and Counties and Mayor of Leduc County

Sylvan Lake Regional Wastewater Commission chair Thom Jewell said the project, with provincial support covering 90 per cent of the cost, means the local environment will be protected and residents won’t have to face the threat of water bans once the project is complete. The line is anticipated to be running in 2020.

“This provincial-regional collaboration represents a major step forward in the long-term protection of the Sylvan Lake watershed. This is not only good for the people across our region but also for today’s and tomorrow’s environment.”

Sylvan Lake Regional Wastewater Commission chair Thom Jewell

Quick facts

  • Budget 2017 invests $474 million in Water for Life and Alberta Municipal Water/Wastewater Partnership grant programs over four years to support smaller communities and regional projects in rural Alberta.
  • These projects are part of the government’s commitment to improve the quality of life for rural Albertans.
  • Today, nearly $200 million is being invested in new and existing water projects, with more than $131 million from Alberta Transportation clean water and wastewater treatment grants:
    • 22 new water projects with total eligible costs of $194 million to be built in several provincial constituencies across most of Alberta, from Milk River (Cardston-Taber-Warner constituency) to Dixonville (Peace River constituency). The province will contribute more than $127 million for these projects.
    • Seven previously approved projects across southern Alberta communities that require additional funding, with total eligible costs of $5.4 million. The province will contribute $4.4 million for these cost revisions that are based on scope or cost changes.
    • This funding is over three years, based on the construction timelines of the projects. These are pay-on-progress programs.

Project guidelines are as follows:

Alberta Municipal Water/Wastewater Partnership (AMWWP)

  • AMWWP assists eligible Alberta municipalities with the construction of priority water supply and treatment and wastewater treatment and disposal facilities.
  • Under AMWWP, grant levels start at 75 per cent up to a population of 1,000 and decline thereafter to “0” at 45,000.
  • The program is available to:
    • cities with an official population under 45,000
    • towns
    • villages
    • summer villages
    • eligible hamlets within counties, municipal districts, Métis settlements, the Special Areas and improvement districts
    • regional commissions

Water for Life (W4L)

  • Regionalization of water supply systems started in the 1960s in the Edmonton area. In 2004, Alberta Environment and Parks completed a comprehensive provincewide risk assessment report of municipal waterworks systems that identified options for communities, such as individual plant upgrades, regional water pipelines, remote facility monitoring and technical support and regional operational consortiums.
  • There is a higher capital cost to implement regional systems but, in the long term, regional systems provide the best overall benefit.
  • The W4L initiative was initiated in 2006 and is an ongoing program.
  • The objective is to support the development of new regional water and wastewater systems under AMWWP that are more cost?effective and/or environmentally desirable than independent systems.
  • The W4L strategy initiative is available only to new regional water or wastewater systems or to new extensions of existing regional water or wastewater systems (to service new customers).
  • Commissions/municipalities are required to demonstrate the regional alternative is cost-effective and economically justified compared to alternative facility solutions. Environmental requirements, efficiencies in management and operational practices are also taken into account. Pipelines for new regional systems (water or wastewater) are funded at 90 per cent.

Below are the June 1, 2017 approved projects and a funding breakdown (Some amounts are rounded):

New Water for Life (W4L) projects

Municipality

Grant Description

Eligible Project Cost

Grant Amount

Municipality Amount

Capital Region Parkland Water Services Commission

CRPWSC Twinning Phase 2 Acheson to Spruce Grove to provide additional water supply for the City of Spruce Grove, Town of Stony Plain, Parkland County and the WILD Regional Water Commission.

$19,100,000

$5,464,333

$13,635,667

Capital Region Parkland Water Services Commission

CRPWSC Twinning Phase 3 Spruce Grove to Stony Plain to provide additional water supply for the City of Spruce Grove, Town of Stony Plain, Parkland County and the WILD Regional Water Commission.

$12,800,000

$3,661,961

$9,138,039

County of Northern Lights

Northern Lights/Peace River regional waterline to provide water supply to Dixonville.

$37,756,507

$28,196,559

$9,559,948

County of Thorhild

Hamlet of Long Lake regional waterline to provide water supply to the community.

$11,350,000

$10,215,000

$1,135,000

County of Vermilion River

Phase 6 regional waterline, Kitscoty to Islay - continuation of the regional water system serving the ACE Water Corp. municipalities from the City of Lloydminster.

$3,259,256

$2,933,330

$325,926

Shirley McClellan Regional Water Services Commission

Donalda to White Sands waterline provides regional water supply to the Summer Village of White Sands.

$1,434,500

$1,291,050

$143,450

Shirley McClellan Regional Water Services Commission

Regional waterline to Brownfield to provide regional water supply to the Hamlet of Brownfield.

$2,612,600

$2,351,340

$261,260

Sylvan Lake Regional Wastewater Commission

Regional wastewater system Phase 5 Sylvan Lake to the County of Red Deer provides for the construction of a regional wastewater line from the Town of Sylvan Lake and surrounding Summer Villages.  This project eliminates the discharge of municipal wastewater upstream of the plant.

$41,200,000

$37,080,000

$4,120,000

Total - new W4L 

 

$129,512,863

$91,193,573

$38,319,290

New Alberta Municipal Water/Wastewater Partnership (AMWWP) projects

Municipality

Grant Description

Eligible Project Cost

Grant Amount

Municipality Amount

County of Big Lakes

Hamlet of Joussard WTP upgrade for additional water treatment capacity.

$4,800,000

$3,600,000

$1,200,000

County of Grande Prairie

Bezanson sewage lagoon expansion to meet Alberta Environment wastewater treatment requirements.

$534,000

$400,500

$133,500

County of Grande Prairie

Waterline from well to the new, packaged Teepee Creek water treatment plant for additional water supply capacity.

$225,000

$168,750

$56,250

County of Mackenzie

Zama City water supply improvements to meet Alberta Environment water treatment requirements.

$941,000

$705,750

$235,250

County of Saddle Hills

Woking WTP upgrade and clear well expansion to meet Alberta Environment water treatment requirements.

$1,556,000

$1,167,000

$389,000

Fairview

Install aeration systems in existing 3 raw water reservoirs to meet Alberta Environment water treatment requirements.

$727,000

$545,250

$181,750

MD of Wainwright

New well – Fabyan to provide for additional water supply capacity.

$28,000

$21,000

$7,000

Milk River

Raw water reservoir upgrade to provide additional raw water storage to ensure water supply during dry weather occurrences.

$1,860,000

$1,395,000

$465,000

Mountain View Regional Water Services Commission

Line twinning from Midline Reservoir to Crossfield to provide additional water supply capacity.

$25,528,500

$10,737,287

$14,791,213

Nobleford

Wastewater lagoon upgrade to meet Alberta Environment wastewater treatment requirements.

$3,152,034

$2,206,424

$945,610

Specialized Municipality of Wood Buffalo

Hamlet of Conklin water treatment plant Phase 2 construction to meet Alberta Environment water treatment requirements.

$2,862,750

$764,354

$2,098,396

Three Hills

Water treatment plant upgrades to meet Alberta Environment water treatment requirements.

$14,785,083

$8,913,316

$5,871,767

Tri Village Regional Sewage Services Commission

Lift station and force main upgrades to meet Alberta Environment wastewater treatment requirements.

$4,180,000

$2,930,598

$1,249,402

Wembley

Wastewater membrane bioreactor containers to meet Alberta Environment wastewater treatment requirements.

$3,207,438

$2,172,414

$1,035,024

Total - new AMWWP 

 

$64,386,805

$35,727,643

$28,659,162

Previously approved Water for Life projects with additional funding

Municipality

Grant Description

Eligible Project Cost

Grant Amount

Municipality Amount

County of Cypress

Hamlet of Schuler regional water supply - engineering and design work determined part of an existing waterline needed to be replaced.

$666,046

$599,441

$66,605

County of Newell

Regional water supply system from Brooks – additional work to Alberta Environment treated waterlines regulations.

$754,810

$616,227

$138,583

County of Vermilion River

Stage 1 Vegreville to Two Hills – increased costs due to higher construction costs.

$1,541,467

$1,387,320

$154,147

Total- W4L

 

$2,962,323

$2,602,988

$359,334

Previously approved Alberta Municipal Water/Wastewater projects with additional funding

Municipality

Grant Description

Eligible Project Cost

Grant Amount

Municipality Amount

County of Big Lakes

Enilda wastewater lagoon upgrade – increased design work and construction costs.

$1,307,478

$980,609

$326,870

County of Big Lakes

Faust wastewater lagoon expansion – increased design and storage upgrade costs.

$71,745

$53,809

$17,936

Forestburg

Water treatment plant – increased costs due to lack of interest in original tender.

$771,371

$578,528

$192,843

Specialized Municipality of Crowsnest Pass

SCADA upgrade – increase due to scope change and construction cost upgrades.

$269,608

$185,140

$84,468

Total – AMWWP 

 

$2,420,203

$1,798,086

$622,117

Combined approved W4L/AMWWP

 

$5,382,525

$4,401,074

$981,451

 

Eligible Project Cost

Grant Amount

Municipality Amount

Grand total

$199,282,193

$131,322,290

$67,959,903

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