First Nations Women's Council on Economic Security

Bertha Anderson-Laboucan

Bertha Anderson-Laboucan is a First Nation mother, grandmother, social worker and educator from the Treaty Eight territory in northern Alberta. Her first language is Cree. Bertha has just recently completed her Master of Social Work degree in clinical social work and is currently doing contract work providing mental health supports for First Nation communities. Bertha also has completed her Master of Education degree and is a former teacher and school principal for First Nation schools in northern Alberta.

Geri Bemister-Williams

Geri Bemister-Williams is a Professor of Criminology and Law and a Substance Abuse Consultant for Siksika Nation. She provides post-secondary education, expert input, counseling and programming, non-profit board member service, advice on substance use disorders/concurring disorders and at-risk populations. Geri’s portfolio includes family counselling, individual therapy, interventions, public speaking, spiritual guidance, sober living advising, addressing physical and psychological traumas, teaching, child protection and advocacy and first nations issues.

Crystal Good Rider

Biography currently not available

Melinda Laboucan

Melinda is a proud member of the K’asho Got’ine First Nation. She is the founder of the non-profit organization, Goba. The organization focuses on providing effective, supportive, culturally safe healthcare and medical travel experiences for northerners receiving care in Alberta. The program works closely with northern partners, Alberta Health Services, and other supporting agencies. Melinda is a well-regarded conference speaker, leader of sharing circles, and presenter. She is an innovative and inspirational programmer, facilitator, advocate, and problem solver. 

Suzanne Life-Yeomans

Suzanne Life-Yeomans is co-chair of the First Nations Women’s Council on Economic Security. Suzanne has more than 20 years experience working with First Nation communities. Her focus has been on ensuring First Nations Treaty and Aboriginal Rights are not infringed upon. She is a strong advocate for supporting Indigenous women to thrive in every situation, and believes that through Indigenous culture, Indigenous Peoples can survive anything. Suzanne also believes that only with true understanding of our pain can there be true healing, so future generations can thrive in a meaningful way. Suzanne has a Master in Business Administration, and pursues lifelong learning.

Delilah Mah

Delilah Mah is a descendant of the Saulteaux, Cree and French peoples. Her family roots connect to Keeseekoose First Nation - Treaty No.4 Territory, as well as to George Gordon, Cotes, Key and Muskowekwan First Nations. She is a social entrepreneur, artist, photographer and Indigenous planning consultant. Delilah completed her Bachelor of Education Degree from the University of Alberta and is currently completing a Master of Business Administration in Community Economic Development through Cape Breton University.

Delilah has always had a passion for building a community founded upon supporting one another and making a difference. She volunteers on various boards, school councils. Most recently, Delilah founded the Indigenous Women’s Business Panel - Iskwew founded, Iskwew run, and Iskwew made to create space for local Indigenous entrepreneurs and artists in traditional Treaty 6 territory.

Delilah is also the founder of BravHer Consulting and Mah Art & Photography. BravHer Consulting is all about framing the connections between planning and Indigenous Peoples while being mindful of economic reconciliation.

Meeka Otway

Meeka Otway is president of the Inuit Edmontonmiut, the Inuit Society of Edmonton, and serves on the Pauktuutit, the national board for Inuit women.

She is a community liaison officer for the Indigenous and Global Health Research Group at the University of Alberta. Meeka is fluent in Inuktitut and translates for various groups, such as the Baffin Regional Education Board.

Meeka has volunteered at numerous conferences, most recently at the National Roundtable on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.