Get your shot at a million dollars

Enter once for 3 shots to win! All Alberta residents 18+ who have had at least one dose of an approved COVID-19 vaccine can enter now for a chance to win $1 million this July. Get your second dose and you will have 2 more chances to win in August and September.

Registration for the first draw closes June 24 at 11:59 pm.

If you're not vaccinated yet, book your shot today so you can enter the Open for Summer Lottery.

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Book your free shot. It's safe and easy.

COVID-19 vaccines help prevent you from getting infected and protect you from getting severely sick if you do get it. All vaccines are safe, effective and save lives.

Everyone born in 2009 or before (turning 12+) can get their first and second doses now.

Book your shot at a participating pharmacy, through the AHS online booking tool or call 811. More appointments will be added as we get more doses. Temporary walk-in clinics are available for first doses of Pfizer.

Find a pharmacy Book AHS online Find a walk-in clinic

Progress to date

As of June 20:

  • 3,804,700 doses administered
  • 70.7% of Albertans age 12+ with at least one dose
  • 29.2% of Albertans age 12+ fully vaccinated
  • 596 adverse events following immunization reported (learn about vaccine safety)

See full stats and map

Second doses

Every Albertan should get their second dose when they're eligible. A single dose of COVID-19 vaccine offers at least 80% protection against severe outcomes, including hospitalization and death. However, second doses are needed to get the best and most long-lasting protection.

  • Second dose for mRNA (Pfizer/Moderna) recipients

    If you got an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) for your first dose, you should get an mRNA vaccine for your second dose to become fully vaccinated, but it doesn't need to be the same brand. Both Pfizer and Moderna are considered interchangeable so book the first appointment available.

    Youth ages 12 to 17 must receive the Pfizer vaccine for both doses.

    When to book

    • Book your second dose 4 weeks after your first dose:
      • first dose in March, April or May – book second dose now
      • first dose May 29-31 or June – book second dose 4 weeks after your first dose

    How to book

    Where possible, AHS and participating pharmacies who administered your first dose will contact you when you are eligible for your second dose. You do not need to wait to be contacted to book an appointment once you are eligible and you can choose where you go to get your second dose.

  • Second dose for AstraZeneca recipients

    If you got AstraZeneca for your first dose, you can choose either the AstraZeneca vaccine or an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer/Moderna) for your second dose.

    Both options will provide additional protection and count as completing your immunization in Canada. International jurisdictions may have different standards for a complete immunization series.

    Effectiveness and safety information is provided below to help you make the decision that best meets your needs.

    When to book

    • Book your second dose 8 weeks after your first dose of AstraZeneca

    How to book

    Effectiveness after second dose

    • AstraZeneca
      • In clinical trials, AstraZeneca prevented 60% to 80% of sickness from COVID-19 and was even more effective in preventing severe illness and death, starting 2 weeks after the second dose.
    • mRNA (Pfizer/Moderna)
      • Most studies looking at giving an mRNA vaccine after a first dose of AstraZeneca are not finished yet.
      • An early study from Spain showed greatly improved immune response, compared with no second dose, when Pfizer vaccine was given 8 or more weeks after a dose of AstraZeneca vaccine.
      • It is possible that using different vaccines might stimulate the immune system in different ways and provide a stronger immune response, but studies are still ongoing.

    Safety of second doses

    • AstraZeneca
      • A very rare but serious condition of blood clots combined with low levels of blood platelets (known as VITT) has been reported.
      • In Canada, there has been one case reported for every 55,000 first doses.
      • The rate of blood clot cases after a second dose is not clear yet, but data from the United Kingdom currently suggests it is much rarer than after first doses – roughly 1 case per 600,000 doses were reported after 9 million second doses given.
    • mRNA (Pfizer/Moderna)
      • No instances of VITT or other safety signals have been reported from mRNA vaccines.

    Possible side effects after second dose

    • AstraZeneca
      • Most reactions, like headache and tiredness, are rarer and milder than the first dose.
    • mRNA (Pfizer/Moderna)
      • A study from the United Kingdom showed that people who got the Pfizer vaccine 4 weeks after a dose of AstraZeneca vaccine had more general reactions like fever and aches than those who received the AstraZeneca vaccine for their second dose.
      • In a study from Spain where people had the Pfizer vaccine 8 weeks after a dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine, side effects were mild and went away on their own.

    Learn more: Second dose for AstraZeneca recipients (PDF, 51 KB)

  • Second dose for profoundly immunocompromised

    People who are profoundly immunocompromised and meet the eligibility criteria can book their second doses earlier.

    When to book

    • Pfizer or Moderna – 21 to 28 days after your first dose
    • AstraZeneca – 8 weeks after your first dose is recommended, but you may choose to get your second dose as early as 28 days after your first dose

    How to book

    • Call 811 for an evaluation of your eligibility and to book your appointment. Do not call a pharmacy or use the AHS online booking tool.

    Eligible conditions

    • Transplant recipients, including solid organ transplants and hematopoietic stem cell transplants.
    • Individuals with malignant hematologic disorders and non-hematologic malignant solid tumours receiving active treatment (chemotherapy, targeted therapies, immunotherapy), excluding individuals receiving solely hormonal therapy, radiation therapy or a surgical intervention.
    • Individuals being treated with an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody such as Rituximab.
    • Individuals on regular dialysis treatment for chronic kidney disease.

    Single dose efficacy 76% up to 90 days, second dose at 6 weeks or less: 55% efficacy, second dose at 12 weeks or more: 81% efficacy (Voysey, et al. 2021. Single-dose administration and the influence of the timing of the booster dose on immunogenicity and efficacy of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 (AZD1222) vaccine: a pooled analysis of four randomised trials. The Lancet. 397:10277(P881-891))

After your vaccine

  • Rules for fully vaccinated people

    Until more Albertans are protected, partially and fully vaccinated people must continue following all public health measures: no indoor social gatherings, keep 2 metres apart from others, wear a mask in public, wash your hands, and stay home when sick.

    Once both doses take effect, you are less likely to become severely sick with COVID-19. But we don’t yet know if the vaccine prevents vaccinated people from spreading the virus.

    We must continue reviewing emerging evidence on asymptomatic and variant transmission before we can safely alter public health guidelines.

    We will let Albertans know when rules can be changed, based on Alberta's Open for Summer Plan.

  • Isolation and quarantine requirements for vaccinated Albertans

    Fully vaccinated

    If you are fully-vaccinated* and are exposed to a COVID-19 case:

    • If you have no symptoms, you are not required to quarantine.
    • If you do have symptoms, you must isolate for 10 days and should get tested – your isolation can end early if you test negative.

    Partially vaccinated

    If you are partially vaccinated* and are exposed to a COVID-19 case:

    • If you have no symptoms, you must quarantine for 10 days and should get tested.
      • Your quarantine can end early if you test negative on day 7 or later.
      • If you test negative before day 7, you must remain in quarantine and need a second negative test on day 7 or later to end quarantine.
    • If you do have symptoms, you must isolate and should get tested.
      • If you test negative before day 7, you must continue to quarantine (10 days total from exposure date).
      • If you test negative on day 7 or later and your symptoms have resolved, your quarantine can end.

    Learn more about isolation and quarantine requirements.

    *You are considered fully vaccinated 14 days after receiving both doses in a 2-dose vaccine series, or 1 dose in a 1 dose vaccine series.
    You are considered partially vaccinated 14 days after receiving the first dose in a 2-dose vaccine series.

  • Immunization records

    You will receive an immunization record at your vaccination appointment.

    You can also access immunization records on MyHealth Records.

  • Vaccinated outside Alberta

    Updating provincial records

    • Anyone who received a first dose or was fully vaccinated outside of Alberta can submit their information online at ahs.ca/vaccineregistry.
    • You can submit out-of-province or out-of-country immunization records for yourself or on behalf of your children under 18 years of age.
    • Submitted records will be reviewed by AHS, and verified submission information will be available on your MyHealthRecords account within 2-3 weeks.

    Getting your second dose

    • Anyone who was partially vaccinated outside Alberta can get a second dose here when they are eligible. Please bring the original written record of your first dose with you to the appointment.

    Call Health Link at 811 if you have any further questions.

Need time off work?

All working Albertans can access 3 hours of paid, job-protected leave to get each dose of the vaccine. Learn more.

Need a ride?

Isolated seniors and those with mobility challenges can get a ride to and from their appointment. Call 211 for help.

Need translated info?

Vaccine info is available in عربي, 中文, हिंदी, 한국어, فارسی, ਪੰਜਾਬੀ, Af-Soomaali, Español, Français, Tagalog, Tiếng Việt, اردو.

Who should get vaccinated

Every Albertan who can get vaccinated, should get vaccinated.

Vaccines make our immune systems stronger by building antibodies to help prevent and fight off diseases. Because COVID-19 is a new virus, no one has previous immunity. It is much safer and more effective to get immunized than it is to get infected.

Get vaccinated

  • Albertans born 2009 or before (turning 12+)
  • Recovered from COVID-19

Consult doctor first

  • If you have questions about the vaccine or your health conditions

Don't get vaccinated

Get the facts

Canada has one of the most robust vaccine approval processes in the world. Any adverse effects have been minimal.

The COVID-19 vaccines meet high national requirements. They are safe and vital.

Seniors are at a higher risk from COVID-19. Vaccines help your immune system and fight off disease.

COVID-19 vaccines are for young and healthy people, too. They can protect you and those around you.

All approved vaccines effectively prevent serious illness and death.

Get vaccinated as soon as you can, no matter what vaccine is provided.

About the vaccines

All approved vaccines are safe, effective and will help prevent serious illness. You're encouraged to review current evidence to make an informed decision about your health.

  • AstraZeneca (COVISHIELD) vaccine

    The AstraZeneca (COVISHIELD) vaccine is proven highly effective in preventing serious illness and death in adults.

    Who should get it

    • Eligible Albertans 18 and older.
      • Albertans 18 and older can access the AstraZeneca vaccine if they have a contraindiction to, or refuse, the mRNA vaccines
      • Second doses of AstraZeneca vaccine are also available to those who received the vaccine as their first dose.

    Who shouldn't get it

    • Not currently recommended for people under 18.

    Effectiveness

    • Reduces infection by 60-80% and was even more effective in preventing severe illness and death.
    • May be less effective preventing spread to others, but evidence is still emerging.

    How it works

    • Viral vector vaccines use a modified harmless virus (vector) to carry the genetic code for the COVID-19 virus spike protein. Once in the cells, the vaccine provides instructions for the cell to make the spike protein, which then cause your immune system to produce antibodies that will protect you against COVID-19.

    Possible side effects

    • Pain at injection site, body chills, feeling tired or feverish are common.
    • Allergic reactions are rare. As with any medication, you should contact your health care provider if you experience any health concerns.
    • Rare instances of blood clots (known as VITT) are under investigation. These are rare and treatable.
      • To date, Alberta has reported 5 cases and 1 death.
      • Based on cases identified to date in Canada, the rate of VITT has been estimated at approximately one case in 55,000 first doses of vaccine.
      • The rate of VITT after a second dose is not clear yet, but data from the United Kingdom currently suggests it is much rarer than after first doses – roughly one case per 600,000 doses were reported.
         
  • Moderna and Pfizer vaccines

    The Moderna and Pfizer BioNTech vaccines are proven highly effective in preventing serious illness and death.

    Who should get it

    Who shouldn't get it

    • Effectiveness in younger people has not yet been established.
    • Consult your doctor if you have questions about your health conditions.

    Effectiveness

    • Prevents severe illness and death by 80-90%.

    How it works

    • Uses mRNA technology to teach cells how to make a protein to trigger an immune response and make antibodies to fight the COVID-19 virus. It does not alter your DNA.

    Possible side effects

    • Pain at injection site, body chills, feeling tired or feverish are common.
    • Allergic reactions are rare.
    • No major safety concerns have been identified.
  • What's the difference?

    All 3 vaccines help our bodies learn how to protect us against future infection from the virus that causes COVID-19, but use a different mechanism to get the attention of the immune system:

    • AstraZeneca uses a modified harmless virus (vector) to carry the genetic code for the COVID-19 virus spike protein. Once in the cells, the vaccine provides instructions for the cell to make the spike protein, which then cause your immune system to produce antibodies that will protect you against COVID-19.
    • Moderna and Pfizer use a mRNA technology to teach cells how to make a protein to trigger an immune response and make antibodies to fight the real virus. It does not alter your DNA.

    While all 3 vaccines are highly effective, Moderna and Pfizer appear to be slightly more effective than AstraZeneca:

    • Moderna and Pfizer are 80-90% effective in preventing severe illness and death
    • AstraZeneca is about 60-80% effective in reducing infection and is even more effective in preventing severe illness and death. It may be less effective preventing spread to others, but evidence is still emerging.

Vaccine safety

Thanks to worldwide collaboration, COVID-19 vaccines were developed quickly without compromising safety. Every approved vaccine has met Health Canada's strict standards for safety, quality and effectiveness.

Phases

Alberta's vaccination program was completed in stages to ensure people most at risk got vaccinated first. All Albertans turning 12 and older are now eligible to get vaccinated.

  • Early Phase: December 2020

    Vaccinations were offered to key populations, with a focus on acute care sites with the highest COVID-19 capacity concerns in Edmonton and Calgary:

    • Health-care workers in intensive care units
    • Respiratory therapists
    • Staff in long term care and designated supportive living facilities
  • Phase 1: Started January

    Vaccinations are being offered to key populations across the province:

    • Seniors born in 1946 or earlier (turning 75+), no matter where they live:
      • AHS will vaccinate residents in retirement centres, lodges, supportive living, and other congregate living facilities with people 75 or older
      • Albertans 75+ can book an appointment online, call Health Link 811, or contact a participating pharmacy
    • Respiratory therapists
    • Health-care workers in intensive care units
    • Health-care workers in emergency departments
    • Health-care workers in COVID-19 units, medical and surgical units, and operating rooms
    • Paramedics and emergency medical responders
    • Staff in long term care and designated supportive living facilities
    • Home care workers
    • All residents of long term care and designated supportive living, regardless of age
    • First Nations, Inuit and Métis persons born in 1956 or earlier (turning 65+)  living in a First Nations community or Metis Settlement
  • Phase 2A: Started March 15

    Who's eligible in Group A

    • Albertans born 1947 to 1956 (turning 65 to 74), no matter where they live
    • First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) people born 1971 or earlier (turning 50+), no matter where they live
    • Staff and residents of licensed seniors supportive living facilities not included in Phase 1

    How to book

  • Phase 2B: Started March 30

    Who's eligible in Group B

    • Albertans born 2009 to 1957 (12 to 64) with eligible high-risk underlying health conditions.

    How to book

    When booking for a youth born between 2009 and 2006, make sure to have first contacted your physician and received a doctor’s note (required).

    Eligible health conditions

    • Asplenia or dysfunction of the spleen (a missing spleen or a spleen that is no longer working)
    • Cancer (anyone with a new diagnosis of or treatment for all forms of cancer in the last year, except non-invasive skin cancer)
    • Chronic heart disease and vascular disease:
      • Including: congenital heart disease, chronic heart failure, heart or kidney disease from high blood pressure, and a history of a stroke
      • Not including: high blood pressure alone
    • Chronic kidney diseases requiring regular medical monitoring or treatment
    • Chronic Liver disease due to any cause (for example: cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis, and hemochromatosis)
    • Chronic neurological disease (for example: epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, MS, muscular dystrophy and dementia)
    • Chronic respiratory (lung) diseases:
      • Including: COPD, cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, and severe asthma that required an asthma-related emergency department visit or hospital admission in the past year
      • Not including: mild or well-controlled asthma
    • Diabetes requiring insulin or other anti-diabetic medication to control
    • Immunosuppression: a weakened immune response due to disease or treatment, including:
      • anyone undergoing chemotherapy or treatment for HIV, genetic disorders of the immune system
      • people receiving long-term medical treatment to control severe inflammation such as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus
    • Pregnancy: anyone who is currently pregnant
    • Severe mental Illness or substance use disorder requiring a hospital stay during the past year (for example: schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorders and others)
    • Severe obesity: a Body Mass Index of 40 kg/m2 or more
    • Severe or profound learning disabilities or severe developmental delay:
      • Including: individuals with Down syndrome, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, cerebral palsy, autism spectrum disorder and others
      • Not including: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
    • Solid organ, bone marrow or stem cell transplant recipients

    Detailed clinical breakdown of these conditions and who is eligible (PDF, 410 KB)

    Confirming eligibility

    Ages 16+ (or born 2005 and earlier)

    • A doctor’s note is not required for individuals 16 years of age or older to get the vaccine. However, you may want to talk to your doctor or pharmacist to help you understand if your condition is on this list.

    Ages 12 to 15 (or born between 2006 and 2009)

    Youth aged 12 to 15 must have:

    • Proof of identity with a birthdate
    • Verbal consent of a parent or guardian present. If a parent or guardian is not present, the youth must have a printed and signed letter of consent from a parent or guardian.

    Information for parents and guardians about the vaccine (PDF, 333 KB)

    Second doses

    • Some profoundly immunocompromised Albertans may be eligible to receive their second dose early. Review the eligible conditions under Follow up: Second dose and call 811 for an assessment.
  • Phase 2C: Started April 12

    Who's eligible in Group C

    • Starting May 4: Teachers, support staff and child care workers:
      • All certified K to 12 teachers actively teaching in public, separate, francophone, charter, private and First Nations schools
      • Substitute teachers, administrators and other certified teachers working in separate roles
      • Support workers such as education assistants, bus drivers and custodians
      • Child care workers and support staff in licensed child care programs such as day care, out of school care, preschool and family day homes
    • Shelter staff and residents
    • Correctional facility staff and inmates
    • Physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists and all other health care professionals and their office or support staff who provide in-person, direct patient care
    • Individuals working in patient care facilities or providing services directly to clients in the community for Alberta Health Services, Covenant Health, Alberta Precision Labs, DynaLife, and students undertaking placement practicums in clinical areas
    • Healthcare workers on First Nation reserves and Metis Settlements
    • Workers at meatpacking plants – abattoirs for chicken, pork and beef only
    • Residents and support staff at eligible congregate living settings and workplaces at risk for large outbreaks: front-line policing and provincial sheriffs, front-line disability services workers that support clients in a variety of services and living arrangements, mental health and other types of licensed supportive living
    • Caregivers of Albertans who are most at risk of severe outcomes:
      • Up to 4 designated family/support people of those individuals in long term care, designated supportive living and licensed supportive living facilities
      • Household contacts age 16 and over and caregivers for children 11 and under (born in 2010 or later) who have an eligible chronic condition in Phase 2B but are unable to receive the vaccine due to age
      • Household contacts age 16 and over of eligible profoundly immunocompromised Albertans (see list under Follow up: Second dose)
    • Firefighters and front-line policing and provincial sheriffs who interact with residents at shelters, correctional facilities and remand centres
    • Canada Border Services Agency staff

    How to book

    Bring proof of eligibility and employment to your appointment (see below for details).

    Confirming eligibility

    Eligible workers, as well as designated family/support persons, are required to bring the following to their vaccine appointment:

    • Personal ID that shows birthdate (Driver's Licence or Alberta Health Care Card); and
    • Proof of employment or professional registration
      • For staff of congregate facilities and other eligible workers, proof of employment (such as a letter from their employer) is required.
      • For designated family support persons, a letter from the congregate living facility (for example, group home, speciality schools, etc.) is required.
      • An honour system approach will be used for household contacts of children 11 and under with eligible health conditions in Phase 2B.
      • An honour system will be used for household contacts of profoundly immunocompromised individuals.
      • An honour system will be used for teachers, support staff and child care workers.
      • Meatpacking plant workers will be offered the vaccine at on-site clinics provincewide. Workers who do not receive the vaccine at the plant will receive a letter to present at an AHS immunization clinic or participating pharmacy.
      • Health care staff who work in community practices will be notified of their eligibility through their employer, regulatory college or professional association. See the full list of eligible healthcare workers (PDF, 227 KB).
  • Phase 2D: Started April 30

    Who's eligible in Group D

    • Albertans born 1957 to 1971 (turning 50 to 64).
    • First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) persons born 1972 to 1986 (turning 35 to 49), no matter where they live.
    • Residents of Bow Valley and the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo born in 2003 or earlier (turning 18+).

    How to book

  • Phase 2 (AstraZeneca): Started April 6

    Who's eligible for AstraZeneca (based on availability)

    • Albertans born in 1981 or earlier (turning 40+).
    • Residents of Bow Valley and the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo born in 1991 or earlier (turning 30+).

    How to book

    • Due to limited supply, existing doses will be reserved for those who have a contraindication to an mRNA vaccine or are eligible to receive their second dose (12-16 weeks after their first, or as early as 28 days if profoundly immunocompromised). Call 811 for information.

    We are reviewing emerging evidence on the effectiveness of mixing vaccine types for first and second doses before making a decision.

    AstraZeneca is a safe vaccine proven highly effective in preventing serious illness and death.

    Single dose efficacy 76% up to 90 days, second dose at 6 weeks or less: 55% efficacy, second dose at 12 weeks or more: 81% efficacy (Voysey, et al. 2021. Single-dose administration and the influence of the timing of the booster dose on immunogenicity and efficacy of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 (AZD1222) vaccine: a pooled analysis of four randomised trials. The Lancet. 397:10277(P881-891))

  • Phase 3: General Public - Started May 6

    Who's eligible in Phase 3

    • Every Albertan born in 1991 or earlier (30+), starting May 6
    • Every Albertan born in 2009 or earlier (12+), starting May 10

    How to book

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Sign up to get notified when there are vaccine updates and timeline changes. This is not a registration to receive the vaccine.

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The personal information collected through the COVID-19 status notification subscription form may be used for the purpose of providing you with COVID-19 status updates.

This personal information collection is authorized under section 33(c) of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy (FOIP) Act.

If you have any questions about this collection of personal information, you may contact Director, Alberta.ca at:

Director, Alberta.ca
10th Floor, 108 Street Building
9942 108 Street
Edmonton, AB T5K 2J5