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COVID-19 vaccines help prevent you from getting infected and protect you from getting severely sick if you do get it. All vaccines are safe, effective and save lives.

All Albertans 5 years and older can now get vaccinated. Some people most at risk of severe illness can get a third dose. Children 5 to 11 must book online or by calling 811, walk-ins are not available at this time.

AHS clinics and pharmacies use the same central online booking system. You can also book by calling 811, visiting a walk-in clinic, or contacting a doctor's office.

Book with AHS or pharmacy Find a walk-in Find a doctor's office

Progress to date

As of November 29:

  • 6,890,791 doses administered
  • 88.8% of Albertans 12+ with at least 1 dose
  • 83.9% of Albertans 12+ fully vaccinated
  • 2,048 adverse events following immunization (learn about vaccine safety)

See full stats and map

Vaccines for children

Connecting parents to expert advice and helpful resources on vaccines for children.

Join Dr. Hinshaw for a telephone town hall about vaccines for children aged 5 to 11 on November 30.

Vaccine records

Alberta vaccine records with QR codes (paper or digital) is now the only valid Alberta-issued proof of vaccination accepted by operators participating in the Restrictions Exemption Program.

Businesses will use the AB Covid Records Verifier app to scan your QR code. When scanned, it displays your name, birthdate and vaccination status. It is not connected to other personal info.

  • Get your vaccine record

    Vaccine record with QR code

    • Albertans can get their vaccine record with QR code at alberta.ca/CovidRecords.
      • It's fast and easy – no account required. Enter your personal healthcare number, birthdate, and month and year of vaccination.
      • Download your card and print out, or save on your phone.
      • If you were vaccinated recently, it may take up to 2 weeks for your records to be available online.
    • For help accessing or printing a vaccine record:
  • Accepted vaccine doses, types and records

    Vaccine doses

    • To enter spaces participating in the Restrictions Exemption Program, people ages 12 and older must be fully vaccinated.
    • Fully vaccinated means at least 14 days have passed since the second dose of a 2-dose vaccine, or single dose of a one-dose vaccine (Janssen).

    Vaccine records accepted in Alberta

    • Alberta's vaccine record with QR Code (paper or digital) is now the only valid Alberta-issued proof of vaccination accepted by operators participating in REP.
    • Other accepted forms of proof of vaccination include:
    • Personal identification that matches the vaccine record is also required for all adults 18 and over.

    Vaccine types accepted in Alberta

    • Pfizer/BioNTech
    • Moderna
    • AstraZeneca/COVISHIELD
    • Janssen
    • Sinovac
    • Sinopharm
  • Update or correct your vaccine record

    Incorrect information on vaccine record

    • If your vaccine record has missing or incorrect information, consult the tips on our Covid Records Helpdesk.
    • You will need to get a new vaccine record every time you get another dose.

    Vaccinated in Alberta without personal health number

    • If you were vaccinated in Alberta but don't have an Alberta Personal Health Number, call 811 to get a vaccine record with QR code mailed to you.
    • If you become eligible for an Alberta Personal Health Number, you can use it to access your vaccine record online at alberta.ca/CovidRecords.

    Alberta residents vaccinated outside Alberta

    • If you or your children under 18 were partially or fully vaccinated outside of Alberta, update your health records by submitting your digital out-of-province/country immunization records online at ahs.ca/vaccineregistry.
    • Submitted records will be reviewed by AHS:
      • If more information is required to validate your record, AHS will contact you.
      • If your record cannot be validated, a letter will be sent. Book an appointment to begin or complete a valid COVID-19 vaccination series.
    • Verified information will be available on alberta.ca/CovidRecords in up to 2 weeks.

    New to Alberta

    • If you recently moved to Alberta, use your provincial vaccine record with a QR code or out-of-country vaccine record.
    • New residents who were not vaccinated in Alberta cannot get an Alberta-issued vaccine record.

    Update records in another province or country

    • If you were vaccinated in Alberta but are from another province or country, you can send them your Alberta immunization record(s) to update their vaccination system. Check the instructions for your home province or country.
  • When to show proof of vaccination

    Businesses and events in Alberta

    • Some businesses, entities and organizers may require proof of vaccination to access their facilities, services or events.
    • Vaccine records with QR code (paper or digital) is the only valid provincial proof of vaccination accepted by operators participating in the Restrictions Exemption Program.
    • Vaccine records from First Nations, military and other countries will continue to be accepted.
    • Plan ahead for busy events by saving a copy on your phone or printing it out.

    Inter-provincial travel

    • Some provinces may require travellers from Alberta to provide proof of vaccination to visit or access certain business or services. Check before you go.
    • Show your Alberta vaccine record along with valid personal ID.

    International travel

    • Foreign countries may require Canadian travellers to provide proof of vaccination to visit. Check the requirements of individual countries, state/local governments, cruise lines and events before travelling. Learn more about travelling abroad during COVID.
    • Alberta's vaccine record has been updated to meet the Canadian standard for domestic and international travel.
      • Save your vaccine record from alberta.ca/CovidRecords before travelling. You cannot access this website from outside Canada.
      • Your proof does not guarantee entry to another country.
    • Provinces retain the vaccination records of their respective residents. Your data will not be shared with the federal or other provincial governments.

Second doses

Every Albertan should get a second dose to get the best protection.

  • Second dose for mRNA (Pfizer/Moderna) recipients

    If you got an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) for your first dose, you should get an mRNA vaccine for your second dose to become fully vaccinated, but it doesn't need to be the same brand. Both Pfizer and Moderna are considered interchangeable so book the first appointment available.

    For more on mRNA vaccines, including information on safety, side effects and effectiveness of second doses, see second dose for mRNA recipients (PDF, 54 KB).

    When to book

    • Book your second dose 8 weeks after your first dose.

    How to book

    Where possible, AHS and participating pharmacies who administered your first dose will contact you when you are eligible for your second dose. You do not need to wait to be contacted to book an appointment once you are eligible and you can choose where you go to get your second dose.

    Safety of second doses

    Rare cases of heart inflammation (known as myocarditis and pericarditis) following COVID-19 vaccination have been reported in Canada and internationally.  International data suggests this may occur more frequently after receiving a second dose of an mRNA vaccine, but cases remain extremely rare.

    For more information, see Q&A: Myocarditis and/or peridcarditis following COVID-19 vaccines (PDF, 344 KB).

  • Second dose for AstraZeneca recipients

    If you got AstraZeneca for your first dose, you can choose either the AstraZeneca vaccine or an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer/Moderna) for your second dose.

    Both options will provide additional protection and count as completing your immunization in Canada. International jurisdictions may have different standards for a complete immunization series.

    Effectiveness and safety information is provided below to help you make the decision that best meets your needs.

    When to book

    • Book your second dose 8 weeks after your first dose of AstraZeneca

    How to book

    Effectiveness after second dose

    • AstraZeneca
      • In clinical trials, AstraZeneca prevented 60% to 80% of sickness from COVID-19 and was even more effective in preventing severe illness and death, starting 2 weeks after the second dose.
    • mRNA (Pfizer/Moderna)
      • Most studies looking at giving an mRNA vaccine after a first dose of AstraZeneca are not finished yet.
      • An early study from Spain showed greatly improved immune response, compared with no second dose, when Pfizer vaccine was given 8 or more weeks after a dose of AstraZeneca vaccine.
      • It is possible that using different vaccines might stimulate the immune system in different ways and provide a stronger immune response, but studies are still ongoing.

    Safety of second doses

    • AstraZeneca
      • A very rare but serious condition of blood clots combined with low levels of blood platelets (known as VITT) has been reported.
      • In Canada, there has been one case reported for every 55,000 first doses.
      • The rate of blood clot cases after a second dose is not clear yet, but data from the United Kingdom currently suggests it is much rarer than after first doses – roughly 1 case per 600,000 doses were reported after 9 million second doses given.
    • mRNA (Pfizer/Moderna)
      • No instances of VITT or other safety signals have been reported from mRNA vaccines.

    Possible side effects after second dose

    • AstraZeneca
      • Most reactions, like headache and tiredness, are rarer and milder than the first dose.
    • mRNA (Pfizer/Moderna)
      • A study from the United Kingdom showed that people who got the Pfizer vaccine 4 weeks after a dose of AstraZeneca vaccine had more general reactions like fever and aches than those who received the AstraZeneca vaccine for their second dose.
      • In a study from Spain where people had the Pfizer vaccine 8 weeks after a dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine, side effects were mild and went away on their own.

    Learn more: Second dose for AstraZeneca recipients (PDF, 51 KB)

  • Second dose for immunocompromised

    Immunization for immunocompromised individuals should occur at a time when the individual is most likely to mount an immune response. Consult your physician for the best time based on your treatment plan.

    When to book (general guidance)

    • Pfizer or Moderna – 8 weeks after your first dose
    • AstraZeneca – 8 weeks after your first dose is recommended, but as early as 28 days after your first dose if that is the most appropriate timing
  • Second dose for those vaccinated outside Alberta

    • Anyone who was partially vaccinated outside Alberta can get a second dose here when they are eligible.
    • Bring the original written record of your first dose with you to the appointment.
    • Call Health Link at 811 if you have any further questions.

Third doses

Immunity levels may decline sooner in some people. Third doses can boost immunity to improve protection for those most at risk.

  • Third dose for immunocompromised

    Immunocompromised Albertans 12 and older

    • Eligible immunocompromising conditions include:
      • recipients of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T-cell therapy
      • moderate to severe primary immunodeficiency (for example, DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
      • Stage 3 or advanced HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
      • immunosuppressive therapies (for example, anti-B cell therapies, high-dose systemic corticosteroids, alkylating agents, antimetabolites, or tumor-necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors and other biologic agents)
      • transplant recipients, including solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplants
      • chronic kidney disease receiving regular dialysis
      • receiving active cancer treatment (chemotherapy, immunotherapy or targeted therapies), excluding those receiving only hormonal therapy, radiation therapy or surgery
      • taking certain medications for autoimmune diseases including rituximab, ocrelizumab and ofatumumab
    • When to book: Must wait at least 8 weeks after second dose.
    • How to book: Call 811, book online with AHS or a participating pharmacy, or contact a physicians’ office
  • Third dose for seniors

    Albertans 70+

    • Eligibility: Seniors ages 70+ can book a third dose now.
    • When to book: 6 months after your second dose. Must show proof of age before the vaccine is administered.
    • How to book: Call 811, book online with AHS or a participating pharmacy, or contact a physicians’ office.

    Residents of seniors’ supportive living

    • Alberta Health Services will coordinate additional COVID-19 doses for residents of seniors’ supportive living with other immunization partners as needed at least 5 months after their second dose.
    • Eligible residents of supportive living facilities will receive their third doses at their facilities.
  • Third dose for First Nations, Métis and Inuit people

    First Nations, Métis and Inuit people

    • Eligibility: People ages 18+ can book a third dose now.
    • When to book: Must wait at least 6 months after second dose.
    • How to book: Call 811, book online with AHS or a participating pharmacy, or contact a physicians’ office. Clinics are also available on reserve.
  • Third dose for health-care workers

    Health-care workers

    • Eligibility: Health-care workers who provide direct patient care and who got a second dose less than 8 weeks after their first dose can get a third dose.
    • When to book: Must wait at least 6 months after second dose.
    • How to book: Call 811, book online with AHS or a participating pharmacy, or contact a physicians’ office.
  • Additional doses for travellers or AstraZeneca/Janssen recipients

    International travellers

    • Eligibility: Travellers to jurisdictions that don't recognize Covishield/AstraZeneca or mixed series doses can get additional dose(s) of vaccine.
    • When to book: Must wait at least 4 weeks after second dose.
    • How to book: Call 811, book online with AHS or a participating pharmacy, or contact a physicians’ office.

    AstraZeneca or Janssen recipients

    • Eligibility: People who received 2 doses of AstraZeneca or one dose of Janssen can get a booster of an mRNA vaccine, if they have not already received an mRNA dose for travel purposes.
    • When to book: Must wait at least 6 months after second dose (or first for Janssen).
    • How to book: Call 811, book online with AHS or a participating pharmacy, or contact a physicians’ office.

After your vaccine

  • Rules for fully vaccinated people

    Fully vaccinated Albertans must still follow public health measures as indicated.

    Masks are mandatory in all indoor public settings and workplaces.

  • Isolation and quarantine requirements for vaccinated Albertans

    Fully or partially vaccinated

    • If you are fully or partially vaccinated* and are exposed to a COVID-19 case:
      • You are not required to quarantine.
      • If you are not fully vaccinated and you are identified as a household contact, you should stay home for 14 days (i.e. not attend work, school or other activities).
      • If you are partially vaccinated and you are identified as a household contact, you should stay home for 14 days (i.e. not attend work, school or other activities).

    International travellers

    • Quarantine rules have changed for fully and partially vaccinated Canadians returning from travel outside of the country.

    Learn more about isolation and quarantine requirements.

    Learn more about COVID-19 travel requirements.

    *You are considered fully vaccinated 14 days after receiving both doses in a 2-dose vaccine series, or 1 dose in a 1 dose vaccine series.
    **You are considered partially vaccinated 14 days after receiving the first dose in a 2-dose vaccine series.

  • Travel requirements

    International travel

    • International travel requirements continue to evolve. Check the policies of individual countries, state/local governments, cruise lines and/or venues and events before travelling.
    • Some jurisdictions are only accepting travellers that are fully immunized with vaccines they have authorized.
    • The Government of Canada continues to work with jurisdictions around the world to have all vaccines authorized in Canada, including mixed series, recognized as valid doses.
    • Upon return to Canada, quarantine and testing requirements may be reduced for fully immunized travellers who meet specific conditions.

    United States travel

    • There are currently no immunization restrictions for visitors entering the United States, including for those who received AstraZeneca/COVISHIELD as part of their immunization series.
    • Some private sector events, such as shows and concerts, may have different rules.
    • For more information, visit the CDC website.

    Canada travel

    • Travellers to Canada are required to show proof of full vaccination at the border to be considered for exemption from quarantine and testing requirements.
    • In Canada, individuals that have had 2 doses of an approved vaccine are considered fully vaccinated, even if each dose is a different type. The AstraZeneca and COVISHIELD vaccines are recognized as the same product.
    • For more information and instructions, visit the Government of Canada website.

    Alberta travel

    • Alberta does not require proof of vaccination from visitors arriving from another part of Canada.

Vaccine facts

Busting myths is about being armed with the facts. Get the information you need to stay safe.

Get the facts

Need help booking your appointment?

See guides for registering an account, booking appointment and common topics.

Need time off work?

All working Albertans can access 3 hours of paid, job-protected leave to get each dose of the vaccine. Learn more.

Need a ride?

Isolated seniors and those with mobility challenges can get a ride to and from their appointment. Call 211 for help.

Need translated info?

Vaccine info is available in Af-Soomaali, Español, Français, Tagalog, Tiếng Việt, عربي, 中文, हिंदी, 한국어, فارسی, ਪੰਜਾਬੀ, اردو.

About the vaccines

All approved vaccines are safe, effective and will help prevent serious illness. You're encouraged to review current evidence to make an informed decision about your health.

  • Janssen vaccine (limited quantities available starting Nov. 12)

    The Janssen vaccine has been proven effective in preventing serious illness and death in adults from COVID-19 infection. It is currently offered as a single-dose vaccine. A booster dose of an mRNA vaccine is recommended after 6 months.

    Who should get it

    • Eligible Albertans age 18 years and older. It is available to those who have a contraindication to, or refuse, an mRNA vaccine.
    • Due to limited quantities, call 811 to book an appointment at select locations across Alberta.

    Who shouldn't get it

    • Not currently authorized for people under 18.

    Effectiveness

    • About 67% effective in preventing symptomatic infection 14 days after immunization.
    • May be less effective preventing spread to others, but evidence is still emerging.

    How it works

    • Viral vector vaccines use a modified harmless virus (vector) to carry the genetic code for the COVID-19 virus spike protein. Once in the cells, the vaccine provides instructions for the cell to make the spike protein, which then cause your immune system to produce antibodies that will protect you against COVID-19.

    Possible side effects

    • Pain at injection site, body chills, feeling tired or feverish are common.
    • Allergic reactions are rare. As with any medication, you should contact your health-care provider if you experience any health concerns.
    • Some rare reactions that have been reported and confirmed after taking Janssen vaccine are:
      • Thrombosis with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome (TTS). The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reports the risk of TTS following immunization with the Janssen vaccine to be about 3.1 per million doses administered.
      • Capillary leak syndrome
      • Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS)

    Learn more: Janssen fact sheet (PDF, 48 KB)

  • Moderna and Pfizer vaccines

    The Moderna and Pfizer BioNTech vaccines are proven highly effective in preventing serious illness and death.

    Who should get it

    • Pfizer BioNTech is approved for people 5 and older.
    • Moderna is approved for people 12 and over but recommended for people 30 and over. People 12 to 29 are recommended to get the Pfizer vaccine as the rare risk of myocarditis is even lower.

    Who shouldn't get it

    • Consult your doctor if you have questions about your health conditions.

    Effectiveness

    • Prevents severe illness and death by 80-90%.

    How it works

    • Uses mRNA technology to teach cells how to make a protein to trigger an immune response and make antibodies to fight the COVID-19 virus. It does not alter your DNA.

    Possible side effects

    • Pain at injection site, body chills, feeling tired or feverish are common.
    • Allergic reactions are rare.
    • No major safety concerns have been identified.
    • Rare cases of heart inflammation (known as myocarditis and pericarditis) after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine have been reported internationally and in Canada. Investigations are ongoing. These are cases are rare, treatable, and typically mild.
      • As of September 23, 2021, there have been 24 reported cases of myocarditis in Alberta out of more than 6 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines administered.
      • 16 cases are associated with the Pfizer vaccine and 7 cases are associated with the Moderna vaccine. Current evidence suggests a likely causal association between myocarditis and the mRNA vaccines.
      • Learn more about myocarditis and pericarditis following COVID-19 vaccines (PDF, 444 KB)
  • AstraZeneca (COVISHIELD) vaccine

    The AstraZeneca (COVISHIELD) vaccine is proven highly effective in preventing serious illness and death in adults.

    Who should get it

    • Eligible Albertans 18 and older.
      • Albertans 18 and older can access the AstraZeneca vaccine if they have a contraindiction to, or refuse, the mRNA vaccines
      • Second doses of AstraZeneca vaccine are also available to those who received the vaccine as their first dose.

    Who shouldn't get it

    • Not currently recommended for people under 18.

    Effectiveness

    • Reduces infection by 60-80% and was even more effective in preventing severe illness and death.
    • May be less effective preventing spread to others, but evidence is still emerging.

    How it works

    • Viral vector vaccines use a modified harmless virus (vector) to carry the genetic code for the COVID-19 virus spike protein. Once in the cells, the vaccine provides instructions for the cell to make the spike protein, which then cause your immune system to produce antibodies that will protect you against COVID-19.

    Possible side effects

    • Pain at injection site, body chills, feeling tired or feverish are common.
    • Allergic reactions are rare. As with any medication, you should contact your health-care provider if you experience any health concerns.
    • Rare instances of blood clots (known as VITT) are under investigation. These are rare and treatable.
      • To date, Alberta has reported 5 cases and 1 death.
      • Based on cases identified to date in Canada, the rate of VITT has been estimated at approximately one case in 55,000 first doses of vaccine.
      • The rate of VITT after a second dose is not clear yet, but data from the United Kingdom currently suggests it is much rarer than after first doses – roughly one case per 600,000 doses were reported.
         
  • What's the difference?

    All 4 vaccines help our bodies learn how to protect us against future infection from the virus that causes COVID-19, but use a different mechanism to get the attention of the immune system:

    • The AstraZeneca and Janssen vaccine uses a modified harmless virus (vector) to carry the genetic code for the COVID-19 virus spike protein. Once in the cells, the vaccine provides instructions for the cell to make the spike protein, which then cause your immune system to produce antibodies that will protect you against COVID-19.
    • Moderna and Pfizer use a mRNA technology to teach cells how to make a protein to trigger an immune response and make antibodies to fight the real virus. It does not alter your DNA.

    All 4 vaccines are effective, with the mRNA vaccines (Moderna and Pfizer) shown to be highly efficacious and viral vector vaccines (AstraZeneca and Janssen) shown to be high to moderately effective.

    • Moderna and Pfizer are 75 to 92% effective in preventing against infection and 80 to 90% effective in preventing severe illness and death
    • AstraZeneca is about 60 to 80% effective in reducing infection and 78 to 87% effective in preventing severe illness and death. It may be less effective preventing spread to others, but evidence is still emerging.
    • Janssen is about 66% effective at reducing infection and 85 to 93% effective in preventing against severe disease and hospitalization. It may be less effective preventing spread to others, but evidence is still emerging.

    After your vaccine, it’s normal to have some minor side effects like fever or aches that go away on their own after a few days. As with all medicines, there's also a small chance that there will be a serious side effect like an allergic reaction, so it is important to stay for monitoring at the place you get your vaccine for 15 minutes after being vaccinated. Some very rare reactions after COVID-19 vaccines include:

    Duration of protection

    Vaccines offer not only good protection against illness but are also even better at preventing severe outcomes and hospitalizations after the second dose. Studies regarding how long vaccines offer protection against severe outcomes of COVID-19 are ongoing and current evidence shows COVID-19 vaccines offer effective protection for at least 6 months.

Vaccine safety

Thanks to worldwide collaboration, COVID-19 vaccines were developed quickly without compromising safety. Every approved vaccine has met Health Canada's strict standards for safety, quality and effectiveness.

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